Tue, 03/06/2018 - 10:52am
A new breeding technique using a plant's own DNA could produce crops that are more resistant to drought and disease: A team of University of Georgia researchers has developed a new way to breed plants with better traits. By introducing a human protein into the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana, researchers found that they could selectively activate silenced genes already present within the plant. Using this method to increase diversity…
Tags: marine science, Thinc. at UGA, Black History Month, Skidaway Inst of Oceanography - Department of Marine Sciences, movement, Fair, Dawson Hall
Tue, 02/13/2018 - 11:44am
A research team led by professor of biochemistry and molecular biology Debra Mohnen has discovered that manipulation of the same gene in poplar trees and switchgrass produced plants that grow better and are more efficiently converted to biofuels: Due to the composition of plant cell walls, plant material is not efficiently broken down or deconstructed to the basic sugars that are converted to biofuels. In a paper published today in Nature…
Tags: Thinc. at UGA, Human Nature, Black History Month, Correll Hall
Thu, 01/11/2018 - 2:24pm
Distinguished Research Professor Kelly Dawe in the department of genetics is principal investigator on a new project to sequence the genetic diversity of the world's largest cash crop: When the human genome was first sequenced in 2001, the project focused on a single individual. Since that time, several new genomes have been assembled and additional genetic data have been generated for thousands of individuals, producing a more complete picture…
Tags: fees, course materials, Thinc. at UGA, movement, Dawson Hall, Department of English, Creswell Hall, Law, Black History Month
Tue, 11/22/2016 - 11:06am
The power of technology is one thing, but novel uses of great tools to investigate complex questions is connecting researchers with new insights, like this new study from the department of psychology: The same compounds that give plants and vegetables their vibrant colors might be able to bolster brain functioning in older adults, according to a recent study from the University of Georgia. The research from the department of psychology is the…
Tags: Carl Vinson Institute of Government International Center, Certificate, Thinc. at UGA, Human Nature
Tue, 03/22/2016 - 10:27am
The 2016 recipient of the Regents Professorship is chemist Michael K. Johnson, an internationally renowned pioneer in the development of methods for investigating the biological properties of metals that are essential to life processes in plants and animals.  Regents Professorships are bestowed by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia on faculty members whose scholarship or creative activity is recognized nationally and…
Tags: Rossini, Thinc. at UGA
Fri, 07/31/2015 - 11:13am
An international group of scientists that includes assistant professor of genetics Dave Nelson has discovered how parasitic plants, which steal their nutrients from another living plant, evolved the ability to detect and attack their hosts. Their findings were  published recently in the journal Science: As plant roots grow, they release hormones called strigolactones into the soil. This is a signal that normally helps fungi form a beneficial…
Tags: master class, Human Nature, The Linguistics Society at UGA, Hugh Hodgson School of Music, Thinc. at UGA, advising
Wed, 07/15/2015 - 10:32am
Analogies can be highly effective expressions of a point that seems to go missing and/or is very difficult to understand - take the point, for example, that the Earth's resources are indeed exhaustible and need to be conserved, protected, enhanced and replenished: "You can think of the Earth like a battery that has been charged very slowly over billions of years," said the study's lead author, John Schramski, an associate professor in UGA's…
Tags: Department of Psychology, Computer Science, sports, Exhibit Opening, Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, Thinc. at UGA
Thu, 10/30/2014 - 11:52am
It sounds like the title of a cable documentary (a good one! And maybe it is) but scientists from North America, Europe and China have published a paper in PNAS that reveals important details about key transitions in the evolution of plant life on Earth: From strange and exotic algae, mosses, ferns, trees and flowers growing deep in steamy rainforests to the grains and vegetables humans eat and the ornamental plants adorning people's homes, all…
Tags: Thinc. at UGA, Creswell Hall, Human Nature, English
Thu, 06/28/2012 - 4:14pm
Coevolution is the change of a biological object triggered by the change of a related object. And up until now there has been little evidence of it driving changes in Earth's history, though that, too, seems to be changing: A new University of Georgia study shows that some native clearweed plants have evolved resistance to invasive garlic mustard plants—and that the invasive plants appear to be waging a counterattack. The study, published in…
Tags: School of Social Work, English, Thinc. at UGA, Theatre and Film Studies, Conner Hall