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Tags: Native Americans

Tue, 10/26/2021 - 10:51am
The Native American leader and scholar of the Cherokee Nation, Sequoyah (ᏍᏏᏉᏯ Ssiquoya) completed his independent creation of the Cherokee syllabary in 1821, making reading and writing in Cherokee possible. His achievement was one of the few times in recorded history that a member of a pre-literate people created an original, effective writing system, and his syllabary allowed the Cherokee nation to be one of the first North American Indigenous…
Wed, 10/06/2021 - 11:10am
Claudio Saunt, Richard B. Russell Professor in American History and Co-Director of the Center for Virtual History, has been awarded the 18th annual Ridenhour Book Prize for his widely celebrated work, Unworthy Republic: The dispossession of Native Americans and the road to Indian Territory: The Ridenhour Prizes seek to recognize and encourage those who persevere in acts of truth-telling that protect the public interest, promote social justice or…
Mon, 09/20/2021 - 9:48am
The University of Georgia Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Institute for Native American Studies has received a gift to recruit and support scholarships for Native American students at the university. The gift by UGA alumnus Chris Goeckel is designed to bring graduate students from across the United States to study at UGA and to promote the importance of the Native American Studies curriculum for the campus community. The UGA Institute of…
Mon, 06/07/2021 - 11:38am
Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights announced the winners of its 2021 RFK Book and Journalism Awards on Thursday, June 3 during a virtual ceremony.  This year's RFK Book Award winner is "Unworthy Republic: The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory," by Claudio Saunt,  Richard B. Russell Professor in American History.  Winners of the 2021 RFK Journalism Awards were selected from over 350 entries across print, broadcast,…
Mon, 03/22/2021 - 1:01pm
"Unworthy Republic, The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory" by Claudio Saunt, Distinguished Research Professor and Richard B. Russell Professor in American History, is one of two acclaimed works that will be awarded the 2021 Bancroft Prizes in American History and Diplomacy by Columbia University Libraries: The Bancroft Prize, which includes an award of $10,000 to each author, is administered by Vice Provost and…
Fri, 10/02/2020 - 3:26pm
***Update***  Saunt named a finalist on Oct. 6. Final announcement 11/18 Claudio Saunt’s book, Unworthy Republic: The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory, has been named to the 2020 longlist for the National Book Award for Nonfiction. “It’s a great honor to be one of the 10 authors selected for the National Book Award longlist. The category is nonfiction, not just history, and it is really gratifying to see …
Tue, 08/25/2020 - 10:13am
UGA Eidson Chair of American Literature LeAnne Howe (Choctaw) has coedited WHEN THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD WAS SUBDUED, OUR SONGS CAME THROUGH: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry, the first comprehensive collection of Native poetry. The collection, which gathers work from the seventeenth century to the present, representing more than 160 poets from 91 indigenous nations, is available from W. W. Norton & Company August 25, 2020: This…
Wed, 07/15/2020 - 2:36pm
An interdisciplinary team of scientists studying thousands of oyster shells along the Georgia coast, some as old as 4,500 years, has published new insights into how Native Americans sustained oyster harvests for thousands of years, observations that may lead to better management practices of oyster reefs today. Their study, led by University of Georgia archaeologist Victor Thompson, was published July 10 in the journal Science Advances. The new…
Wed, 03/25/2020 - 9:59am
New books, along with perspective and insights on COVID-19, brought the work of Franklin faculty into a variety of media during March. A sample of the coverage and noted expertise: ‘Unworthy Republic’ Takes an Unflinching Look at Indian Removal in the 1830s - new book by Richard B. Russell Professor in American History Claudio Saunt reviewed in the New York Times The Stories That Skewed American Popular Memory of the Civil War, interview with…
Wed, 10/09/2019 - 2:59pm
UGA and the Franklin College welcome former Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation Chad Smith to deliver a Signature Lecture Thursday, October 10, 2019 at 4 p.m. in room 286 Miller Learning Center. In his lecture, "Cherokee Removal and the Trail of Tears: The Unlearned Lessons of Populism Today," Chad Smith looks at the rise of a hard-edged populism with Andrew Jackson, leading to Cherokee Removal from their homeland in Georgia and the Southeast…
Wed, 09/18/2019 - 1:52pm
Sarah Deer, 2014 MacArthur Fellow, Chief Justice for the Prairie Island Indian Community Court of Appeals, and Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies professor at the University of Kansas, is the featured speaker for the fifth annual American Indian Returnings (AIR) lecture September 19, 4:30 p.m. in the M. Smith Griffith Auditorium at the Georgia Museum of Art. Th event is supported by the Eidson Foundation Fund, the Department of English, with…
Thu, 12/06/2018 - 10:12am
New research by an international team based at UGA raises questions about the timing and nature of early interactions between Indigenous Peoples and Europeans in North America: The European side of first contact with indigenous people and settlement in northeast North America is well known from European sources. Until now it's been assumed that the finds of dated European artifacts provide a timeline for the indigenous peoples and settlements of…
Wed, 07/11/2018 - 3:16pm
Eidson Distinguished Professor of American Literature in the department of English LeAnne Howe is a featured writer in Literary Hub's series "New Poetry by Indigenous Women," curated by Natalie Diaz. According to the editor: "This feature of indigenous women is meant to ... offer myriad ways of “poetic” and linguistic experience—a journey through or across memory, or imagination, across pain or joy or the impossibility of each, across our bodies…
Thu, 06/25/2015 - 2:00pm
The speed with which the Confederate flag has fallen below the line of acceptability in a single week is inspiring. That symbol is not just being talked about - it is being taken down. As a part of this swirl of events in motion, predicated on the murderous rampage in Charleston one week ago, how will the conversation to make our campuses more inviting, welcoming and diverse - especially here in the South - continue to progress? Other campuses…

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