Thursday, November 1, 2018 - 10:42am
By:
Alan Flurry

The scope of the fine and performing arts at UGA emanates from our robust degree programs in art, music, dance and theatre and film studies, and extends to the state's official art museum and one of the nation's most influential literary journals. The vision of Lamar Dodd and Hugh Hodgson that placed a premiere importance for the role of the arts at the state's flagship institution has come to fruition and continues to expand and enhance the culture of the UGA learning and living environment. 

Over the next 11 days, UGA celebrates the power of the arts on our campus and community with the Spotlight on the Arts festival:

The festival begins Nov. 1 with Student Spotlight performances from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tate Plaza. “Kaleidoscope: Spotlight on the Arts Opening Celebration,” a free showcase of performances in dance, music, theater and creative writing, follows at 7:30 p.m. in the Performing Ars Center. An after-party will be held at the Lamar Dodd School of Art, where student art exhibitions will be on display. The opening day of the festival also includes the first day of the national conference of the Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru), which is exploring the theme “Arts Environments: Design, Resilience, and Sustainability.”

The festival continues through Nov. 11, with concerts, art exhibitions and demonstrations, book talks, film screenings and theater and dance performances, many of which are free and open to the public or discounted for students.

While the Franklin College will be promoting dozens of events, we want to begin by including UGA Theatre's production of Equus, beginning Nov. 2:

Equus tells the story of Alan Strang, a 17-year-old boy charged with violently blinding six horses in a seemingly unprovoked fit of rage. Strang is submitted to an extended psychiatric evaluation at the hands of Martin Dysart in an effort to discover why a well-adjusted young man would commit such an abhorrent act of violence. Through their sessions, Dysart grows increasingly envious of the passion that drove Strang to his horrific act and develops deep misgivings about the cost of his soul-deadening “cure.” 

Inventive repertoire, inspired performances, innovative exhibitions... the arts are thriving on our stages, in our classrooms and studios, attracting some of the most talented students in the country to study with many of our nation's top performers, creators and scholars. It's a recipe for excellence that benefits us all. See you in the Spotlight.