Wed, 10/03/2018 - 10:31am
The National Institutes of Health Common Fund supports unusually innovative research from early career investigators with the High-Risk, High-Reward Research program. Assistant professor of psychology Katherine Ehrlich received a New Innovator award in the program to determine whether stressful life experiences have more immediate effects on children’s health: The $2.3 million Director’s New Innovator Award from the NIH Common Fund’s High-Risk,…
Wed, 04/04/2018 - 11:07am
50 years ago today, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was assasinated on a balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis. His legacy continues to run deep, his shadow cast long, on American struggles with race, poverty, inequality and injustice. Distinguished Research Professor of English and African American Studies Ed Pavlic offers this meditation on The Forgotten Economic Vision of Martin Luther King: King’s position in history signals part of the…
Tags: Fine Arts Building, Dean Rusk Hall, Anthropology, Department of History, Plastic
Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:53pm
Late start today... but here we go. What do you call a North American institution of higher learning that does NOT have an institute dedicated to Latin American and Caribbean Studies? Well, in so many ways, such a institution would be irrelevant in today's world, because the need for cross-cultural and language studies is only growing as part of any comprehensive educational experience. Thankfully, our LACSI continues to enhance UGA and the…
Tags: injustice, Office of Development and Alumni Relations, poverty
Wed, 10/08/2014 - 10:00am
Something that often goes missing in conversations on, much less debates about, what to do about climate change is optimism. If, for example, a discussion of the economics of the transition to an industrial model from the agricultural age had occured, there would have been great gnashing of teeth but a convincing case could have been made, though likely with some strict limitations toward eventual consequences, if these could have been imagined…
Tags: poverty, Coliseum Training Facility, Earth, Plastic
Mon, 09/22/2014 - 9:29am
Karen Seto and Marshall Shepherd's recent paper in Current Opinions on Environmental Sustainability summarized the role of urbanization on climate and moved the discourse forward on challenges and opportunities at the intersection of the coupled-human natural system.  The objective of this lecture is to discuss the so-called "other," climate change related to human activity (urbanization).  To place urban effects on the climate system in proper…
Tags: poverty, Coliseum Training Facility, robots, Fellows
Wed, 09/10/2014 - 9:33am
The terrific Athropocene Lecture Series continues tomorrow night, Sept. 11, in the Chapel at 7 p.m. with an Archeology of the Anthropocene:   We tend to think that the human capacity for changing the face of the planet as a relatively recent development. Often we attribute its beginnings to the industrial revolution. While certainly today humankind is altering the earth on a larger scale and faster pace that is unmatched in our history, our…
Tags: poverty, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, Hugh Hodgson School of Music
Fri, 08/15/2014 - 11:37am
What are we doing to the planet? Is that even an accurate formulation? In the great words of Tonto, what do you mean 'we'? Humans are of the Earth, and yet at the same time our impact on it has been a great force, often working against it. This can be a complex line of inquiry and to help shed some light on it, our division of biological sciences has devised and will host an important series of public lectures this fall spanning the breadth of…
Tags: poverty, Various