Thu, 04/26/2018 - 11:48am
Extraordinary new research on stem cells in our muscles that affects people at every age: Muscle aches and pains, whether from stretching, strenuous exercise or just normal wear and tear, can put a crimp in your day, a limp in your step and be an actual pain in the neck. But no matter the severity, stem cells in the skeletal muscles called satellite cells play a key role in repairing the damage. Without a proper function of satellite cells, as…
Tags: Department of Psychology and Center for Family Research
Fri, 03/03/2017 - 11:27am
Researchers have developed a new way to identify and sort stem cells that may one day allow clinicians to restore vision to people with damaged corneas using the patient's own eye tissue: The cornea is a transparent layer of tissue covering the front of the eye, and its health is maintained by a group of cells called limbal stem cells. But when these cells are damaged by trauma or disease, the cornea loses its ability to self-repair. "Damage to…
Tags: Georgia Bio, Bellini, Department of Psychology and Center for Family Research, Hugh Hodgson School of Music, Human Nature
Thu, 03/24/2016 - 10:49am
Extraordinarily novel, and painstaking, interdisciplinary research project to develop a better understanding of how neurons grow, connect and function: Goodfellow, a graduate student in the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center, has developed a unique approach of marrying stem cell biology and 3-D imaging to track and label neural stem cells. His findings were published in the journal Advanced Functional Material. Using…
Tags: Department of Psychology and Center for Family Research, Bellini, Human Nature
Wed, 12/18/2013 - 10:05am
Interesting new work on stem cells sheds light on mysteries about cell differentiation: Amar Singh, postdoctoral associate in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, and Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar of Molecular Cell Biology Stephen Dalton worked together to uncover the mystery about why stem cell populations are thought to be heterogeneous, or made up of a variety of different cells. They discovered the heterogeneity, or…
Tags: Human Nature, Department of Psychology and Center for Family Research, Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, Milky Way, Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL)
Thu, 11/01/2012 - 9:59am
New changes in molecular structures on the surface of stem cells, recently discovered by UGA researchers, may play a critical role in the specialization process of embryonic growth: Their study, published recently in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, demonstrated how the genetic expression of specific enzymes resulted in significant changes to the complex chains of sugar molecules that densely coat the outside of cells. Known as glycans,…
Tags: Department of Psychology and Center for Family Research, Human Nature, University of Georgia Opera Theatre, Germanic and Slavic Studies
Fri, 03/02/2012 - 11:25am
The promise of therapeutic stem cells as a strategy to introduce new cells into damaged tissue to treat disease and injury has long been balanced with the practical difficulties of doing so. A new study from researchers in cell biology presents a better understanding of how stem cells transform into other kinds of cells within the body: A University of Georgia study published in the March 2 edition of the journal Cell Stem Cell, however,…
Tags: Department of Psychology and Center for Family Research, Conner Hall, Human Nature