What is Franklin Chronicles?
A successor to our print magazine, The Franklin Chronicles, this blog allows us to continue to communicate the importance of the arts and sciences to an expanded audience through a variety of means – articles and announcements, video, news and opinion – to pick up the conversation of why the arts, humanities and sciences matter so much at this juncture in the history of our university, our nation and the world. Read more
Thursday, December 13, 2018 - 10:48am
How do students find their way into the laboratory? Integrating research experiences into lab courses, where students are tackling a problem related to a faculty member’s ongoing research, can introduce undergraduates to a world of career paths and opportunities as they come to understand research…
Wednesday, December 12, 2018 - 10:53am
English major, Red & Black staff writer, Franklin College SGA senator, Foundation Fellow, world traveler... what can't Griffin Hamstead do with an A.B. degree? I was thrilled to be chosen for board and used my place as a representative in the Senate to pass legislation providing greater…
Tuesday, December 11, 2018 - 11:10am
A TED talk by Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor of Geography and Atmospheric Sciences J. Marshall Shepherd is featured today on TED.com, 3 kinds of bias that shape your worldview: What shapes our perceptions (and misperceptions) about science? In an eye-opening talk,…
Monday, December 10, 2018 - 10:36am
One of our most valued colleagues, Human Resources senior manager Nakia Wade gets the spotlight in Columns: In a college as large and diverse as Franklin, managing human resources matters can include everything from employee relations to hiring to compensation. But the most important part is being…
Friday, December 7, 2018 - 10:47am
Researchers in the UGA department of plant biology have published the first genetic linkage map for what has long-been an object of human fascination: plants that have evolved the capacity to capture and digest insects. Lead author Russell Malmberg explains: "We normally think of plants as being…