What is Franklin Chronicles?
A successor to our print magazine, The Franklin Chronicles, this blog allows us to continue to communicate the importance of the arts and sciences to an expanded audience through a variety of means – articles and announcements, video, news and opinion – to pick up the conversation of why the arts, humanities and sciences matter so much at this juncture in the history of our university, our nation and the world. Read more
Monday, September 17, 2018 - 9:55am
The University of Georgia is celebrating a century of coeducation this year and especially this fall, led by commemorations in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. In 1918, 12 women enrolled at UGA, all in the home economics program, which later became the College of FACS. The entire story…
Friday, September 14, 2018 - 11:23am
The University of Georgia once again hit double digits in the number of international travel-study grants offered to its students and recent alumni through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. With 18 students selected, this marks the fifth straight year—and ninth time in the past 10 years—that UGA…
Thursday, September 13, 2018 - 10:29am
We're seeing, and UGA students are experiencing, great examples of the breadth of expertise in the liberal arts learning environment that is a major research university. With the unfortunately impending hurricane Florence, Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor Marshall Shepherd is…
Wednesday, September 12, 2018 - 11:09am
History Matters/Back to the Future is a national nonprofit organization that “promotes the study and production of women's plays of the past, awarding “Sallie Bingham” grants to four students across the country to produce plays by female playwrights written before 1965. Senior theatre major Ellen…
Tuesday, September 11, 2018 - 10:04am
In Angry Public Rhetorics, Distinguished Research Professor in the department of Communication Studies Celeste Condit explores emotions as motivators and organizers of collective action—a theory that treats humans as “symbol-using animals” to understand the patterns of leadership in global affairs—…