Urbanization and Climate Change: Anthropocene

climate march.jpgComing on the heels of the People's Climate March yesterday in NYC, the next installment of the Anthropocene Lecture Series this week promises to be timely and informative:

The 21st century is the first urban century in the history of humankind.  Current projections suggest that 60-80% of the world population will live in urban settlements by the end of this century.  The urban environment alters climate, weather, and natural cycles (e.g.. water and biogeochemical).  Such interactions also influence human health, energy consumption, transportation, and planning.  Influential at various scales, urbanization is rapidly emerging as a critical area of interdisciplinary study.  The IPCC and U.S. National Climate Assessment included specific groups focused on urban interactions, processes, and feedbacks, related to climate change.  Recently, the National Academies published a report on the looming challenges of urbanization and meteorology. 
Karen Seto and Marshall Shepherd's recent paper in Current Opinions on Environmental Sustainability summarized the role of urbanization on climate and moved the discourse forward on challenges and opportunities at the intersection of the coupled-human natural system.  The objective of this lecture is to discuss the so-called "other," climate change related to human activity (urbanization).  To place urban effects on the climate system in proper context, a broader discussion on anthropogenic climate change will also be presented.

The lecture, featuring professor and atmospheric sciences expert Marshall Shepherd, will be a great opportunity to get the straight facts from one of the world's leading experts - as well as a great chance to hear Dr. Shepherd speak in person. UGA Chapel, 7 p.m.. Get there early.

Image: Poster for the People's Climate March, via Creative Resistance (www.creativeresistance.org)